K-12 tutors needed: UW Pipeline Project

The UW Pipeline Project recruits, trains and places UW students as volunteer tutors in Seattle schools and community organizations. We are recruiting tutors for spring quarter to work with about 40 different schools, and would love to have you!

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Summer campaign staff, Fund for the Public Interest

The Fund for the Public Interest is a national non-profit organization that runs campaigns for America’s leading environmental and social change organizations like Environment America and US PIRG. We launched the Fund in 1982 to help find ways to engage people on the most pressing problems of our day and turn that support into solutions. By having face-to-face, one-on-one conversations, we give millions of people the opportunity for their voices to be heard through petitions, emails, and small donations. This summer we will be working with Environment Washington to protect the Southern Resident Orca.

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EDUC 215: Resilience for College and Beyond (Autumn, 2019)

In EDUC 215, students learn skills to enhance their wellbeing in college and in their life in general. Particular focus is paid to skills that help students withstand common difficulties in life, like a disagreement with a loved one, tolerating doing work you don’t want to do, and managing negative emotions in a healthy way.

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Paid 6 month internships in Fisheries and Aquatic Science (Olympia, WA)

American Conservation Experience, a nationwide Non-Profit Conservation Corps based in Flagstaff, AZ and Salt Lake City, Utah in partnership with the USFWS Puget Sound & Olympic Peninsula Complex in Lacey Washington is seeking TWO Fisheries Field Interns to dedicate 6 months to the monitoring of fisheries resources.

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Exploring Our Watery World at UW’s Aquatic Science Open House

On May 4th, the University of Washington held its second annual Aquatic Science Open House, inviting Seattle-area families, students, and teachers to explore the institution’s marine and freshwater science programs. The event was organized by the Students Explore Aquatic Sciences (SEAS) outreach group based in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (SAFS) and the Academic and Recreational Graduate Oceanographers (ARGO) outreach group based in the School of Oceanography. 

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North Pacific Fisheries Observer, AIS Scientific and Environmental Services (Seattle, WA)

Work at sea collecting and recording fish catch/discard and biological samples for the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) aboard commercial fishing vessels. Observers record detailed information on the gear and fishing activity of the vessels. Vessels range from 40 – 125 ft. and trips can last from 2 – 14 days. After attending a 3 week paid training course in Seattle, WA, observers are deployed from ports throughout the Bering Sea and the Gulf of Alaska.

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(summer positions) Scientific Tech 2, Non-permanent, WA Dpt. of Fish and Wildlife

This recruitment is for six (6), 1-month, non-permanent full-time Scientific Technician 2 positions in the Fish Program, Fish Management, Puget Sound Sampling Unit.

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Internships, Nature Vision Summer Day Camps

Nature Vision is seeking summer interns for our outdoor summer camps at our four camp locations: Redmond, Bothell, Mercer Island, and Shoreline Our Redmond camps run eight weeks throughout the summer.

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Autumn 2019 Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU), Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS)

BIOS has National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) funding to support 8 undergraduate student researchers at BIOS during the fall semester.

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Arsenic-breathing life discovered in the tropical Pacific Ocean

Image of California’s Mono Lake taken from the brown rocky shore

“We’ve known for a long time that there are very low levels of arsenic in the ocean,” said co-author Gabrielle Rocap, a UW professor of oceanography. “But the idea that organisms could be using arsenic to make a living — it’s a whole new metabolism for the open ocean.”

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