34 posts in In the News

[Tide Bites]: Edward Sylvester Morse, 1838-1925 Part of his Legacy: a Shared Japan/U.S. Scholar Exchange Program at FHL

This month’s ‘Tide Bite’ FHL newsletter is about the historical and ongoing connections between UW’s Friday Harbor Labs and the first marine laboratory in the Pacific in Japan.

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[UW Today]: Researchers, students on annual expedition to maintain internet-connected deep-sea observatory

While at sea a deep-sea robot will brave the crushing pressures and cold temperatures, while the team works day and night to direct the dives and prepare equipment above water. The researchers will be cleaning some instruments from marine life, and swapping out sensors that collect hot spring fluids and DNA samples over their year-long missions. The team is posting regular updates from the ship. On Aug. 1, members reported seeing pyrosomes, the bioluminescent tube-shaped tropical animals that have been seen this year off the Pacific Northwest. They are also posting highlights of the robot-captured dive videos, including one showing how marine creatures are getting cozy on the UW-built technology.

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[The Whole U]: Faculty Friday: Luke Tornabene

Learn more about one of the School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences’ newest faculty Associate Professor Luke Tornabene and his work as the curator of the UW Fish Collection in this ‘Faculty Friday’ profile.

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[Tide Bites] Understanding the Effects of Ocean Acidification on Predator-Prey Interactions

bryozoan colonies

Marine organisms are experiencing dramatic environmental changes due to global climate change. As atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations rise, the oceans absorb increasing amounts of carbon dioxide, which results in acidification. While ocean acidification affects several different types of organisms, calcifiers — those that make their shells or skeletons from calcium carbonate like shellfish or corals — have been identified as particularly vulnerable.

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[UW Today]: Video shows invasive lionfish feasting on new Caribbean fish species

Caribbean coral reefs have been invaded by lionfish, showy predators with venomous spines. And they’ve found a new market to exploit: the ocean’s “twilight zone” — an area below traditional SCUBA diving depths, where little is known about the reefs or the species that inhabit them.

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[UW Today] Study shows high pregnancy failure in southern resident killer whales; links to nutritional stress and low salmon abundance

orca breaching

A multi-year survey of the nutritional, physiological and reproductive health of endangered southern resident killer whales suggests that up to two-thirds of pregnancies failed in this population from 2007 to 2014. The study links this orca population’s low reproductive success to stress brought on by low or variable abundance of their most nutrient-rich prey, Chinook salmon.

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[Tide Bites] NOAA Tide and Weather at FHL

This article comes from “Tide Bites”, the monthly newsletter of UW Friday Harbor Laboratories. “NOAA Tide and Weather at FHL” by Erin Dodge: read the full article on the FHL website.
I work for the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Ocean Service (NOS) as a Physical Scientist for the Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). We are part of the Pacific Operations Branch team based in Seattle, WA. 

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[UW Today] New many-toothed clingfish discovered with help of digital scans

from UW Today, April 17, 2017. Note: Adam Summers teaches regularly at Friday Harbor Labs, and he is scheduled to teach BIOL 467: Comparative Animal Physiology at FHL in autumn 2017. You can apply for fall quarter at FHL now, with an early enrollment deadline of May 15.
A set of curious researchers, state-of-the-art visual technology and a bit of good luck helped find a new fish whose tooth collection could put a shark to shame. 

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UW Aquatic & Fishery Sciences & Oceanography both ranked in the top 5 programs in their field globally

A new ranking of global university programs by academic subject highlights the quality of our marine and aquatic science programs. In the lists for their respective subjects, The UW School of Oceanography was ranked 2nd globally, and the UW School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences was ranked 4th. Read on for more details about the ranking and to learn about the other 43 subjects ranked in the top 10 globally.

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Congratulations to 3 MB minors in the Husky 100

Congratulations to three Marine Biology Minors who were recognized as part of the 2017 Husky 100: Jono Grindall, Griffin Hoins, and Sneha Krishnan!

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