40 posts in In the News

[Tide Bites]: River Otters in a Land Without Rivers

3 swimming river otters

“Tide Bites” is the monthly newsletter of UW Friday Harbor Laboratories. This month, outgoing FHL Postdoctoral Fellow Dr. Brent Hughes discusses his research on river otters. Read a short excerpt below, or read the full story at: http://depts.washington.edu/fhl/tidebites/Vol61/index.html. Dr. Hughes talks about his work with three undergraduates working under ‘Doris Duke Conservation Fellowships’. Undergraduates from UW or any school are invited to learn more about this summer opportunity at http://uwconservationscholars.org/.

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[UW IT Connect]: Hacking the ocean’s mysteries

A vast underwater network of systems and sensors are capturing rich, never-before-accessed data from the mysterious world beneath our oceans.

To build a stronger community of scientists using that data to make new discoveries, oceanographers will convene at the UW for Oceanhackweek, August 20-24, 2018, five intensive days of collaborative investigations and tutorials in modern data analysis tools and techniques.

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[UW News]: Great white sharks dive deep into warm-water whirlpools in the Atlantic

Great white shark being tagged

It’s always good to know where great white sharks are likely to be swimming. That’s true if you’re a nervous beachgoer, a fishing boat trying to avoid illegal bycatch, or a marine biologist hoping to conserve this vulnerable species. A study from the University of Washington and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution looked at the movements of adult female white sharks in the Gulf Stream and North Atlantic Ocean. Results showed, surprisingly, that they prefer warm-water eddies — the clockwise-spinning whirlpools in the ocean — and tend to spend more time deep inside these slowly spinning features.

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[UW News] Ocean warming, ‘junk-food’ prey cause of massive seabird die-off, study finds

Michelle Ma, from UW News reports on recently published research from the COASST lab on coastal seabirds:

“In the fall of 2014, West Coast residents witnessed a strange, unprecedented ecological event. Tens of thousands of small seabird carcasses washed ashore on beaches from California to British Columbia, in what would become one of the largest bird die-offs ever recorded.”

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Friday Harbor Labs’ Megan Dethier receives Seattle Aquarium Conservation Research Award

FHL Professor Megan Dethier has received the Seattle Aquarium Conservation Research Award. Read about her work at Friday Harbor Labs, and the strong relationship between the Seattle Aquarium and the University of Washington College of the Environment.

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[Tide Bites]: A Summer Class Success Story

“Tide Bites” is the monthly newsletter of UW Friday Harbor Laboratories. This month, Professor Adam Summers reflects on the 25 year legacy of the ‘Fish Biomechanics’ summer course. Read a short exerpt below, or read the full story at: https://fhl.uw.edu/about/news-and-events/newsletters/. Graduate students and senior level undergrads are encouraged to apply now for summer courses at FHL.

“One class, five weeks, seven publications: that’s a Friday Harbor summer. The class did not just offer a one-time opportunity, it tied a group of young scientists together.”
– Professor Adam Summers, Friday Harbor Labs

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[Tide Bites]: Edward Sylvester Morse, 1838-1925 Part of his Legacy: a Shared Japan/U.S. Scholar Exchange Program at FHL

This month’s ‘Tide Bite’ FHL newsletter is about the historical and ongoing connections between UW’s Friday Harbor Labs and the first marine laboratory in the Pacific in Japan.

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[UW Today]: Researchers, students on annual expedition to maintain internet-connected deep-sea observatory

While at sea a deep-sea robot will brave the crushing pressures and cold temperatures, while the team works day and night to direct the dives and prepare equipment above water. The researchers will be cleaning some instruments from marine life, and swapping out sensors that collect hot spring fluids and DNA samples over their year-long missions. The team is posting regular updates from the ship. On Aug. 1, members reported seeing pyrosomes, the bioluminescent tube-shaped tropical animals that have been seen this year off the Pacific Northwest. They are also posting highlights of the robot-captured dive videos, including one showing how marine creatures are getting cozy on the UW-built technology.

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[The Whole U]: Faculty Friday: Luke Tornabene

Learn more about one of the School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences’ newest faculty Associate Professor Luke Tornabene and his work as the curator of the UW Fish Collection in this ‘Faculty Friday’ profile.

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[Tide Bites] Understanding the Effects of Ocean Acidification on Predator-Prey Interactions

bryozoan colonies

Marine organisms are experiencing dramatic environmental changes due to global climate change. As atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations rise, the oceans absorb increasing amounts of carbon dioxide, which results in acidification. While ocean acidification affects several different types of organisms, calcifiers — those that make their shells or skeletons from calcium carbonate like shellfish or corals — have been identified as particularly vulnerable.

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