Swordfish as oceanographers? Satellite tags allow research of ocean’s ‘twilight zone’ off Florida

Researchers from the University of Washington are using high-tech tags to record the movements of swordfish — big, deep-water, migratory, open-ocean fish that are poorly studied — and get a window into the ocean depths they inhabit.

Read more

Humpback whale population on the rise after near miss with extinction

A population of humpback whales in the South Atlantic has rebounded from the brink of extinction.
Intense pressure from the whaling industry in the 20th century saw the western South Atlantic population of humpbacks diminish to only 450 whales. It is estimated that 25,000 whales were caught over approximately 12 years in the early 1900s.
Protections were put in place in the 1960s as scientists noticed worldwide that populations were declining. 

Read more

Join Environmental Alternative Spring Break!

Students interested in environmental education and outreach can explore options for an ‘Alternative Spring Break’. This requires enrollment in a winter quarter course.

Read more

Piranha fish swap old teeth for new simultaneously

With the help of new technologies, a team led by the University of Washington has confirmed that piranhas — and their plant-eating cousins, pacus — do in fact lose and regrow all the teeth on one side of their face multiple times throughout their lives. How they do it may help explain why the fish go to such efforts to replace their teeth.

Read more

Temporary Laboratory Technician, Hatfield Marine Science Center (Newport, OR)

6-month full-time temporary position working under the direction of NOAA to assist with a laboratory experiment evaluating the impacts of anthropogenic stressors on growth and disease in juvenile fish.

Read more

UW Diving Info Session

Explore how to make diving a part of your study of marine biology and the local marine environment with two UW Scientific Divers.

Read more

Student Spotlight: An Interview with Jonathan Huie

Jonathan Huie is a recent graduate of both the UW Marine Biology and Aquatic and Fishery Sciences degrees. He is currently working at Friday Harbor Labs in the San Juan Islands as a lab technician. Part of his duties includes CT scanning UW Burke specimens as part of the NSF funded effort to scan all vertebrates and upload them to an online and open-source database. He kindly answered a few of our questions about his undergraduate experience as well as offered some advice for students thinking about pursuing a career in marine biology.

Read more

Volunteer with the 2020 Orca Bowl

Volunteer as a competition official, general volunteer or team mentor for Washington’s regional marine sciences bowl.

Read more

Autumn 19 College of the Environment Student Travel & Meeting Fund

Apply now for a scholarship for College of the Environment students to attend or present at conferences. The fund is now accepting applications for autumn 2019 with a deadline of 10/25.

Read more

Inspired by Northern clingfish, researchers make a better suction cup

The finger-sized Northern clingfish employs one of the best suction cups in the world. A small disk on its belly can attach to wet, slimy, even rough surfaces and hold up to 230 times its own body weight. A University of Washington team inspired by the clingfish’s suction power set out to develop an artificial suction cup that borrows from nature’s design. Their prototype, described in a paper published Sept. 9 in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, actually performed better than the clingfish.

Read more
Back to Top