[The Whole U]: Faculty Friday: Luke Tornabene

Learn more about one of the School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences’ newest faculty Associate Professor Luke Tornabene and his work as the curator of the UW Fish Collection in this ‘Faculty Friday’ profile.

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[Tide Bites] Understanding the Effects of Ocean Acidification on Predator-Prey Interactions

bryozoan colonies

Marine organisms are experiencing dramatic environmental changes due to global climate change. As atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations rise, the oceans absorb increasing amounts of carbon dioxide, which results in acidification. While ocean acidification affects several different types of organisms, calcifiers — those that make their shells or skeletons from calcium carbonate like shellfish or corals — have been identified as particularly vulnerable.

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[UW Today]: UW oceanography senior finds plastic microfibers are common on Puget Sound beaches

Profile picture of Frances Eshom-Arzadon

As the infamous floating “garbage patch” churns up bits of plastic in the tropical Pacific Ocean, a University of Washington undergraduate has discovered a related problem much closer to home: nearly invisible bits of plastic on Puget Sound beaches.

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[UW Today]: Video shows invasive lionfish feasting on new Caribbean fish species

Caribbean coral reefs have been invaded by lionfish, showy predators with venomous spines. And they’ve found a new market to exploit: the ocean’s “twilight zone” — an area below traditional SCUBA diving depths, where little is known about the reefs or the species that inhabit them.

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[UW Today] Study shows high pregnancy failure in southern resident killer whales; links to nutritional stress and low salmon abundance

orca breaching

A multi-year survey of the nutritional, physiological and reproductive health of endangered southern resident killer whales suggests that up to two-thirds of pregnancies failed in this population from 2007 to 2014. The study links this orca population’s low reproductive success to stress brought on by low or variable abundance of their most nutrient-rich prey, Chinook salmon.

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Be an “Otter Spotter” for with the Woodland Park Zoo

ACTION ALERT: BE AN OTTER SPOTTER
Report your sightings to help our Northwest conservation research
If you have ever spotted a wild river otter or if you encounter one on your next outdoor adventure, tell us about it! Woodland Park Zoo is studying river otters as sentinels for health along the Duwamish River. Your observations from across Washington will expand our knowledge about otter range and behavior. 

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[Tide Bites] NOAA Tide and Weather at FHL

This article comes from “Tide Bites”, the monthly newsletter of UW Friday Harbor Laboratories. “NOAA Tide and Weather at FHL” by Erin Dodge: read the full article on the FHL website.
I work for the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Ocean Service (NOS) as a Physical Scientist for the Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). We are part of the Pacific Operations Branch team based in Seattle, WA. 

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[job]: Biological Science Technician, Western Fisheries Research Center (Seattle, WA)

Are you a Biological Science Technician with a background in Microbiology? Do you want to be a part of an innovative research science organization? If you answered “yes” to these questions, then this is the job for you! Come join the USGS and start doing the job you’ve always dreamed of!

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[job]: Environmental Education Assistants (full time, Olympia, WA)

LOTT Clean Water Alliance’s WET Science Center provides the community with a fun, hands-on opportunity to learn all about water – one of our most precious resources. The WET Science Center is hiring two full-time Environmental Education Assistants. These are one year positions, with optional extension, beginning in July 2017. Join our education team and help teach thousands of students how to conserve and protect water!

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Undergraduate Research Assistant in School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences

Algae, Daphnia, Microbes, in Closed Ecological Systems
Starting in Summer 2017, with intention on staying and working in Frieda Taub’s lab (Professor Emerita)  for (possibly) two years. A part time position, around 10 hours a week (anywhere from 8-12 hours depending on the week) that is highly flexible to fit around a school schedule.
The student must be interested in Aquatic Ecology with science backgrounds or majors in SAFS/Microbiology/Ecology/Biology/Oceanography/Environmental Science. 

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